Why is “pineapple” in English but “ananas” in all other languages?

Why is “pineapple” in English but “ananas” in all other languages?

Columbus encountered the pineapple in 1493 on the Leeward island of Guadeloupe. He called it piña de Indes, meaning “pine of the Indians”, and brought it back with him to Europe, thus making the pineapple the first bromeliad to leave the New World.

The word “pineapple” in English was first recorded in 1398, when it was originally used to describe the reproductive organs of conifer trees (now termed pine cones). The term “pine cone” for the reproductive organ of conifer trees was first recorded in 1694. When European explorers discovered this tropical fruit in the Americas, they called them “pineapples” (first so referenced in 1664 due to resemblance to what is now known as the pine cone).[7][8] In the scientific binomial Ananas comosus, ananas, the original name of the fruit, comes from the Tupi word nanas, meaning “excellent fruit”,[9] as recorded by André Thevet in 1555, and comosus, “tufted”, refers to the stem of the fruit. Other members of the Ananas genus are often called “pine”, as well, in other languages. In Spanish, pineapples are called piña (“pine cone”), or ananá (ananás) (example, the piña colada drink). (Wikipedia)

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